What’s up guys it’s me Jeremy! We wanted to try something new and break down some of the mechanics or features of League of Legends that you might take for granted since they are super familiar to players in general. Flash is one of these – you use it in pretty much every single game, so although you might have a good understanding about when to use it, you could also be missing a lot of the more interesting tricks you can do when you combine Flash with other game mechanics. Today we’re going to explore some of those tricks so that you guys have even more ways to use the Flash summoner spell in your games in the future! And if you enjoy the video definitely hit that like button because if this video hits, let’s say <X> ratings, then I’m gonna <x>. Admittedly the first trick isn’t really a trick – but it’s a piece of information you absolutely need to understand if you’re going to use the other tricks in this video. Essentially, it’s about the way Flash works from a mechanical perspective – Flash does not interrupt, cancel or delay animations in any way.

That might sound pretty obvious, but it actual has implications that allow all of the tricks in the rest of the video to work. The only thing Flash does is move your champion – so if you use it in combination with abilities, Flash will just move your champion while the animation for that ability is playing out. Okay, so now that’s out of the way we can get into the real tricks. The first one is animation cancel that allows you to cast abilities around 33% faster, and it’s something that actually works on a ton of different abilities. All it takes is to use an ability and then flash immediately afterwards! There’s too many abilities to list all of the ones that work this way, but there’s actually a handy and super simple trick you can use to figure out if it will work. If you cast a skillshot ability when you have your cursor outside the max range of the ability, there’s two things that can happen. Either your champion will cast the skillshot anyway, and it’ll move towards your cursor regardless, or your champion will move forward until the max range of the ability would make it land on your cursor, then they will cast it automatically.

Flash Input buffering will work as long as the skillshots uses the first mechanic, being cast regardless of whether your cursor is in range or not. This technique lets you really surprise people and get the jump on them with a super quick and sneaky play, since it doesn’t only cast the ability fast – it also shortens the animation. That’s because usually the animation would start and end before you flash, but with this trick the animation starts before the flash, and during the cast animation you are flashing.

That makes it way harder to dodge the ability, since you’re essentially both hiding the start of the animation, and casting the ability quicker than usual, leaving the enemy player way less time to react and potentially putting you in a better position to follow up on the damage. The next trick is kinda similar but instead of working with certain skillshots, it actually only works with targeted abilities. Like the last trick, it does let you cast abilities quite a bit faster, and it also adds in an element of surprise that people won’t be expecting. The way it works is you first target an enemy who is outside of range with an ability, which will cause your champion to move towards them until you are in range to cast it. Instead of taking the time to walk into range though, you can actually flash instead, and the input will still be queued and activated once you have flashed into range.

For example, say you want to Rune Prison an enemy champion super quickly but you’re outside of range. Usually you would flash into range then activate Rune Prison, but that’s actually pretty slow because you have to time it yourself or button mash to do it faster. Using this trick, you could target an enemy with a Rune Prison and then flash into range – the Rune Prison cast will still be queued, or ‘input buffered’ so it will automatically cast as soon as you are in range. The trick works because of the first thing we mentioned – flash doesn’t interrupt abilities. If you had targeted someone with Rune Prison and then issued a move command, you would cancel the queued ability.

Flash doesn’t have this problem, so you can queue targeted abilities and flash to quickly execute them and catch people off guard! Just remember, this only works with targeted abilities – so anything that is point and click on a single target should work. Our next tip builds on the previous ones, and it’s about changing the direction of an ability. It applies to both skillshots that have a direction-target, and targeted abilities that have some kind of knockback on the enemy champion that is hit with the ability.

First up we’ll cover the skillshot variant – you just have to animation cancel like we mentioned in the first tip, and the ability will cast from the direction you are facing AFTER the flash. This applies to AoE or cone abilities, such as Cassio’s Ultimate or Lux’s Ultimate, where you can change the direction of where the ability is cast from by flashing in a way that fakes out a certain direction. Unfortunately it doesn’t work for single target stuff like Ahri’s Charm or Amumu’s Q, the technique will still cause you to cast the ability from where you flash to, but it won’t change the direction of the skillshot. It’s another technique that can really catch people off guard, since they might expect you to miss a Lux Ultimate, or think you are targeting someone else, only for you to change the direction and hit them directly! The second version of this trick applies to targeted abilities with knockbacks, such as Vayne’s Condemn or Lee Sin’s Ultimate.

Essentially you have to input buffer like we mentioned before – queue your ability cast on your target, then flash to the opposite side of the direction that you want the enemy champion to be knocked in. The reason it works is because the knockback effect doesn’t trigger until after the cast animation, and it checks where you are positioned before deciding which way to knock an enemy. That means you can cast the ability, then flash to another locate in order to change the angle at which they will be thrown. It’s been famously used for sick outplays with champions like Lee Sin or Vayne, since at first it looks like the ability is going to push an enemy further away, but then quick flash causes them to be fired into a wall or towards the friendly team for an easy kill.

For certain abilities, you can actually flash during the animation to extend the range, and still land the ability at the end of the flash. This is another really famous mechanic, and is often used with stuff like Gragas Body Slam, Vi’s Vault Breaker and Shen’s Taunt. It’s actually use with a lot more abilities than just the well known ones though – any ability in the game that functions as a dash rather than a blink can be used with the range extension flash trick, as long as the ability doesn’t lock onto a single target like Amumu’s Q.

Another good example would be Jarvan’s E-Q combo, you can use the flash to extend the range of the knockup and catch someone that thought they were safe! It’s done by using flash part way through the dash – remember, Flash doesn’t interrupt abilities, so you simply do half the dash in one location, then finish the rest of the dash from the new location after the flash, giving you extra range. This can also be used to hit targets that would have originally been missed with the dash though, such as two opponents that are next to each other that aren’t lined up with your dash. Take Shen’s Taunt for example, and let’s say you are opposite two champions that aren’t in line with you.

You can dash towards one, then the second you hit the first champion you could flash in front of the second enemy, and the dash would continue from that new position, letting you taunt both enemies. This is often used by pros when predicting enemy flashes, for example a Gragas that is ganking a top laner and expects them to flash, so he flashes himself to catch them even though they would have originally flashed outside his dash range.

It’s quite easy to do once you’re used to it, the trick to it is just practice, and getting used to the range of flash which is 425 units. Our last trick is about flashing over large walls, which is something a lot of people know how to do but don’t often understand how it works. Once you do know the exact reason you can flash over walls that are wider than flash’s range, you’ll rarely fail those pesky walls like the banana bush walls near mid lane, or the big wall near top lane. Essentially the way it works, is that if you do something that would hypothetically put you inside of a wall, the game will force you out of the wall on one side or the other based on whichever side you are closest to.

So the best way to do it is to get as close to the wall as possible and then make sure you flash at a spot where the range of flash will cover half of the length of the wall. And using this you can flash over walls that cover almost if not just about twice the range of flash overall! You’ve just got to make sure that your flash will put you on the side of the terrain nearest to where you want to end up, otherwise the flash will fail and the terrain will put you on the wrong side, so you’ll pretty much just flash on the spot. Anyway that just about wraps up today’s video on flash tips and tricks, we really hope you guys liked this one, and if there’s a cool trick you know that we didn’t mention make sure you share it with everyone else in the comments, or just leave us a suggestion of what you think we should talk about next! And it looks like that’s gonna be it from me, if you enjoyed the video drop a like, subscribe if you want, thanks for watching, and I’ll see you guys next time.

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